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compromise | Security Generation
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Posts tagged ‘compromise’

1
Sep

Kernel.org Compromised, OpenSSH Source Not Backdoored

Kernel.org, the primary site for the Linux kernel source, was compromised sometime in August. It is believed that the attackers gained access using compromised user credentials, and then escalated their privileges to root. Early pieces of information implied that some OpenSSH source code was stored on the compromised Kernel.org server(s), apparently this may not be the case. So far the investigation has found that several modifications were made to the compiled OpenSSH client and server binaries running on the system to log user activity. The full extent of the changes is not yet known, and nobody has yet come forward to claim this hack.

If you’ve installed or updated your kernel or OpenSSH recently, you may want to reinstall from a known good version, although it is not yet known if any kernel sources were modified. Although in this case OpenSSH wasn’t compromised, admins can consider running some form of Single Packet Authorization, such as fwknop, as an additional layer of protection for your SSH server against these kinds of issues (backdoors) and other potential future 0days.

Hopefully more info will come to light as the investigation progresses. Hit the jump for more details.

Read moreRead more

15
Dec

Finding Security Bugs in Gawker Source Code

With the recent high-profile Gawker compromise, their entire source code and user database are available as a torrent. Some people have taken to cracking the (weak) password hashes, whilst others are looking for bugs in the source.

Mike Bailey has started Gawker Bug of the Day (@gawkerbugs), and will be disclosing security vulnerabilities in their source code… presumably for funsies.

GBOTD#1 is a XSS found in the first 3 lines of the first file:

http://gawker.com/at.js.php?country=%3Cimg%20src%3D.%20onerror%3Dalert%28document.cookie%29%20%3E

According to Mike, he’s already found over 30 bugs after just a few hours of hunting.

13
Dec

Gawker Media Hacked and Accounts Compromised

Gawker Media, who run many other sites including Lifehacker, Gizmodo and io9, have had their servers and databases hacked by a group called Gnosis. This results in over 1.3 million user accounts being compromised, across their various websites. Part of the issue is the fact that Gawker were using the outdated DES algorithm to secure passwords in the database, making it trivial for the hackers to crack the hashes. To make matters worse, many Gawker admins have also been using extremely weak passwords for their accounts. A full account from the hackers’ perspective can be found here, and there is clearly some beef between them and Nick Denton (owner of Gawker) who appears to have been baiting 4chan (baad idea).

The 1.3 million user accounts, together with Gawker Media’s source code, have been made available in a torrent posted on The Pirate Bay. You can quickly check whether your account is one of those by checking out this spreadsheet (Google). It’s safe to say that if you have any accounts on websites run by Gawker Media, you’re going to want to change your password. If you happen to reuse passwords a lot, then you’ll want to change your password everywhere… isn’t password reuse a joy?

See also: Finding Security Bugs in Gawker Source Code

3
Dec

ProFTPD 1.3.3c Briefly Backdoored by Hackers

Servers of the widely popular FTP server, ProFTPD, were compromised (probably with 0day) on the 28th of November 2010. During the attack, some source code was modified to insert a backdoor. The source files affected were for ProFTPD version 1.3.3c., between the 28/11/2010 and 02/12/2010.

The backdoor introduced by the attackers allows unauthenticated users remote root access to systems which run the maliciously modified version of the ProFTPD daemon.

If you installed or updated ProFTPD from one of the official mirrors during that time, it is recommended that you recompile from a known good version of the code. The source modification was spotted and rectified on 01/12/2010. MD5 sums for the valid source tarballs:

8571bd78874b557e98480ed48e2df1d2 proftpd-1.3.3c.tar.bz2

4f2c554d6273b8145095837913ba9e5d proftpd-1.3.3c.tar.gz

Hit the jump for details on how the backdoor is triggered. A Metasploit module is available to automate the exploit. Read moreRead more

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