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Posts tagged ‘video’

20
Aug

The pending apocalypse? Maybe more fact than fiction

Forget for a moment that the following video is a trailer for an upcoming Tom Clancy game, because it’s beautifully done and highlights a real danger that our world faces as we rely more and more of increasingly fragile systems and infrastructure. I think the things depicted in the video are a far bigger threat than things like terrorism, yet are hardly addressed today.

For those of you actually interested in the game, this gameplay trailer looks pretty cool.

14
Jun

Lock Screen Bypass in iOS 7 Beta 1

iOS 7 LogoA new version of iOS, a new lockscreen/passcode bypass! Luckily this one was caught early in the first Beta of iOS 7 released to developers at WWDC 2013. Although this lockscreen bypass is simpler than some of the previous ones that required some tricky steps to pull off, it’s probably worth pointing out that it will only allow access to the phone’s photos, and the ability to delete, email, tweet or upload the stored image files. It does not allow access to any other apps.

I should point out that I played with iOS 7 for a day, and it was so buggy that I had to downgrade back to iOS 6. Luckily Apple has plenty of time to fix all these issues come the release date this fall.

To bypass the lockscreen simply follow these easy steps:

  1. Pull up the Control Center
  2. Tap the Calculator icon to open it
  3. Pull up the Control Center again
  4. Tap the Camera icon to open it
  5. Tap the photos icon in the bottom-left corner to get full access to the photos

 

Check out the video below to see it in action.

17
Jan

Stop SOPA, Stop PIPA, Stop Censorship

Update: Now that SOPA has been put on the back burner, the next thing to protest is the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), an international treaty which could have massive repercussions on the freedom of the internet.

Update 2 (5 July 2012): ACTA rejected by EU :)

Anyone who follows Security Generation will know that I’m a big advocate of civil liberties and freedom in general. The internet is currently a multicultural and multimedia hub of information, ideas, creativity and innovation, and there is a risk this could be irrevocably changed. Granted there is also a lot of crap on the internet, but freedom works both ways. Whilst the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) intend to reduce piracy on the net, in reality they would hand vast amounts of power over to industry copyright holders, who would then have the ability to have sites blocked and content taken down, inhibit free speech and bring . For more information about all of this, check out this good summary article.

Due to the threat that these acts would pose to the open internet, many large internet companies have stated their opposition including Google, Yahoo!, Twitter, eBay, and Wikimedia, as well as civil liberties groups such as the ACLU and the EFF. On January 18, these and countless other blogs and sites, including Security Generation, will be protesting this legislation by blacking out (read: censor) parts of their sites and educating users about the danger of american censorship.

If you have a blog or website, you’re encouraged to add your voice to the cause. CloudFlare users will be able to easily participate just by enabling the new Stop Censorship app, which will black out large chunks of text on your site, and inform your users about the dangers presented by this type of legislation. WordPress users without CloudFlare can also join in by installing one of the many Stop SOPA/PIPA plugins.

This is my favorite anti-SOPA song so far:

This one is also good.

21
Oct

iPad Lock Screen Bypass Vulnerability using Smart Cover [Patched]

Marc Gurman at 9to5Mac has discovered a vulnerability on the iPad that allows for a limited bypass of the device’s lockscreen. Anyone with an iPad Smart Cover (or fridge magnet) can gain access to the previously-open app (or the home screen if no app was open).

By holding the power button to bring up the ‘Power Off’ screen, closing the smart cover, re-opening it (or just sliding a fridge magnet along the right-hand side of the device), and clicking cancel, the attacker will be dropped into the screen that was open before the iPad was locked. If the attacker gets dropped into the home screen, then they’ll be able to see the installed apps, but won’t be able to open anything. If Safari or Mail (or any other app) was the open when the device was locked, then the attacker would have access to that app.

Unlike Siri being available from the lock screen, which is not a security flaw (an unintended behaviour), this one actually is; and although an attacker does not get full control of the iPad, the severity depends on whether a sensitive app was being used before the device was locked.

Luckily it is possible to protect yourself against this bug in the interim by disabling Smart Covers in Settings > General > iPad Cover Lock/Unlock > Off. Expect Apple to patch this in iOS 5.0.1. Check out 9to5’s video below for a demonstration:

[Update] Apple did indeed patch this bug in iOS 5.0.1. Those of you who disabled your Smart Covers for security purposes can now re-enable them!

17
Oct

A Quick Introduction to Lockpicking and Useful Resources for Beginners

I’ve been into lockpicking for a few years now, and I’m surprised I’ve never posted more about it (maybe I will). Suffice it to say that lockpicking is great fun, you learn a lot, and one day it may come in handy (legally of course). One thing I’ve noticed whenever I talk about lockpicking, is that most people -including techies – have very little clue about how locks themselves actually work. It’s no surprise then that lockpicking feels like a bit of mystery to many. In reality the majority of locks are very simple devices, and many can be picked or bypassed using fairly simple tools.

I had the pleasure of taking part in the Defcon 19 Gringo Warrior contest where participants must bypass a series of locks to ‘escape’. It’s scored based on time and difficult of locks picked. I scored about above average. In this post I’m going to give my own shotgun intro to lockpicking, and provide some videos and links to other useful references where you can go find more detail.

Read moreRead more

1
Sep

Illinois Man Faces 75 Years in Prison for Recording Police

From BoingBoing: “42-year-old Michael Allison of Illinois could spend the rest of his life in prison for recording police in public. He faces five counts of eavesdropping, a class one felony”. That’s the equivalent of rape.

This is absolutely crazy. How law-abiding and tax-paying citizens (who pay for the police) can be harassed for wanting to make on-duty police officers accountable for their actions is beyond understanding. All one has to do is look at the sheer quantity of illegal police behaviour (and more), to see why the free recording of police officers is so absolutely necessary; both for the public’s protection and sometimes the police officers’.

The definition of eavesdropping is “to listen secretly to the private conversation of others”, in this case the police not only knew they were being recorded (edit: allegedly, if recent reports are true, officers were NOT aware they were being recorded, which is what landed Allison in hot water), but it was a conversation between them and Michael Allison. If police officers are allowed to record audio or video of the public with impunity, the public should be allowed to record the police going about their official duties. 75 years for recording on-duty police officers doesn’t even pass the guffaw test for me, a sensible jury will never convict him, if this ever even goes to court – END OF STORY.

[Updated 7/9/11] If recent reports are true, Michael Allison may also have been stupid as well as unlucky. Apparently he covertly recorded court proceedings (which is definitely illegal), and then lied about it to the judge (also illegal), which is how he ended up with all the additional counts of eavesdropping.

Watch the video below for the full story, it’s a great summary.

In a related story where a man was arrested for filming police in Massachusetts, a federal court ruled that videotaping police is an unambiguous and constitutionally protected right.

19
Aug

Safekeeper Hotel Safe Bypass Video

I spent a week in Hawaii on the way back from Blackhat and Defcon in Las Vegas, and my hotel room had a Safekeeper key-lock safe that you had to pay $5 a day to use. Turns out the safe was perfectly usable without the key – which I guess nullifies the safe’s entire purpose. Although it had a Medeco lock, the lock wasn’t really necessary, I used a paperclip as my ‘key’. There must have been something really wrong with the way the plug was installed, I’d be horrified if this ‘attack’ worked on all of these safes. Unfortunately I only had the one in my room to play with.

Check out my demo video below for some facepalm-worthy safe bypass action!

[Updated] A guy called Brad found that his electronic hotel safe could be opened using an all-zero passcode.

24
Jul

Iain Sinclair CardSharp Utility Knife Review

I’m a fan of unusual or paraticularly functional knives, six months ago I got my first Leatherman Wave, which is an awesome tool. I just recently purchased the brand new Iain Sinclair CardSharp Utility Knife, and so far I think it’s pretty good! Its credit card form factor makes it easy to carry around, and its sharp blade makes it useful in a variety of situations. The only criticism I have is that the card/handle is plastic and feels quite flimsy. I was expecting the whole card to be made of thin aluminium, or maybe something more grippy. I’m also worried the little plastic bit that keeps the blade in place whilst closed may potentially wear down eventually. That said, it’s still a unique product, and the blade is excellent, so I definitely recommend it.

I made a quick video review of it (actually one of my first videos). Apologies for the bad quality, I used an old external iSight; turns out their resolution sucks ;)

Here is Iain Sinclair’s own video.

8
Jun

Steve Jobs Presents New Apple Campus to Cupertino Council [Updated]

Just a day after his keynote at the World Wide Developer Conference, Steve was giving a different kind of presentation… to the Cupertino Council.

Five years ago Apple purchased a large chunk of land from HP, and have been planning on building a new campus to house 12,000 employees. As Steve explained (and this guy can sell anything), the new campus will feature a beautiful circular building, to be set in a massive landscaped park. The picture below shows how close it’ll be to Apple’s headquarters at 1 Infinite Loop, and a mock-up of what it will look like from space (likely the setting of Apple’s new campus in 2098).

The campus will even feature its own natural gas power station, because it seems like Steve doesn’t trust the electricity company. The entire project is pegged for completion by 2015.

[Updated 9/06/2011] Steve has made his coucil presentation slides available (PDF). Details have emerged that the architect will probably be Norman Foster.

Hit the jump for a video of Steve’s pitch to the council. Read moreRead more

11
May

BackTrack 5 “Revolution” Released

The most popular security and penetration testing Linux distribution has been updated once again, this time built from scratch! BackTrack 5, codenamed “Revolution”, is based on Ubuntu Lucid LTS with kernel 2.6.38, and brings with it full 32 and 64-bit support, an ARM-compatible image, forensics and stealth modes, KDE (4.6) and Gnome (2.6) desktop environments, and (allegedly) over 350 updated security tools including Metasploit 3.7.0. Best of all it’s “aligned with industry methodologies”! Whatever that means ;)

It appears BackTrack 5 will only be available torrents for the time being. The torrents are available in the following flavours: Gnome ISO (32bit, 64bit, ARM img), Gnome 32-bit VMware Image, KDE ISO (32bit, 64bit). Here’s the BackTrack downloads page. Those of you wondering which flavour to get between Gnome and KDE, it’s largely dependent on one’s taste, but the BackTrack guys appear to be favouring Gnome (which was the default Ubuntu graphics environment). If you have no idea what to get, then grab the Gnome 32-bit ISO (or VMware image) using the links above. I recommend Transmission (Mac) or uTorrent (Mac/PC) for BitTorrent clients. For anyone who hasn’t used BT before, the default username and password is root/toor.

BackTrack is a great tool for network security specialists and penetration testers, but it’s an even more valuable resource for people looking at learning more about application and network security (and Linux). Although I do have an Ubuntu install, I tend to use BackTrack more often due to the convenience (when I’m not using OSX that is ;).

It’s not possible to upgrade from BT4r2 to BT5, so those of you with installations of BackTrack 4 will need to reinstall (or download the new VM).

Check out their shiny promotional video below!

[Updated] BackTrack 5 R2 is now available, and brings a new kernel and 42 new tools. You can update your existing BT5 (R1) installation by running:

echo “deb http://updates.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution main microverse non-free testing” >> /etc/apt/sources.list

apt-get update

apt-get dist-upgrade

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